28 December 2008

Indirect Fire Capabilities

10 December …

Work was good and steady today through the normal weather pattern of a clear sky followed by a sunny sky, a rainshower and repeat. Fort Humid is coming along pleasantly. The outer wall is starting to take shape and will definitely give us better protection. I still feel a little edgy about that strange temple ruin. I just hope we do not awaken this ancient civilization and were they truly as tall as the four guardian statues?

Today, during the operations meeting we were discussing construction and defence when Captain Lamar discussed our indirect fire capabilities, or to be blunt, the relative lack of them. He had valid points about our capabilities with only one rifled howitzer, and produced a book with Middle Age catapults that were effective against infantry, fortresses and even elephants. I have built one such device (a trebuchet) during a combat engineering course in Leeds about four years ago, where we learned the principles of engineering in ancient warfare. Major Higgins thought it was a great idea and asked if I could construct at least one trebuchet, if not two, for a secondary means of defense. Mr. Griggs was delighted by the idea as well and together we will look over plans I still have from my course manual entitled “The Practical Guide to the use and Historical Development of Ancient Engineering Techniques in Modern Warfare. Volume I,” written by Brigadier Ian James Willoughby IV KCB, VC. Yes it is quite a mouthful but it is a very well written book and has engineering drawings drawn to scale.

Well, enough of the diary for the night, as Lady V wants me to take her for a walk to inspect troops.

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